Book Appears in one of the Outlander books TV Appears in Outlander tv show

Quotes: The Scottish Prisoner (174 quotes)

“But it marks you, killing. No matter why it’s done.”
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Prologue
Book Category: War, Fighting and Violence [Comments]


Lord, that she might be safe was his last conscious thought. She and the child.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 1
Book Category: Children, Parenthood and Family [Comments]


He grimaced in the dark at thought of Geneva. He wasn’t feeling charitable at the moment but crossed himself nonetheless and said a brief prayer for the repose of her soul, as he did whenever she came into his mind. He owed her that much, poor lass, no matter what she’d done to him.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 1
Book Category: Religion [Comments]


He was the fuse that would detonate this particular bomb. And he was all too familiar with what happened to fuses, once lit.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 2
Book Category: War, Fighting and Violence [Comments]


“I would not piss on him was he burning in the flames of hell,” Gray said politely.

One of Hal’s brows flicked upward, but only momentarily.

“Just so,” he said dryly. “The question, though, is whether Fraser might be inclined to perform a similar service for you.”

Grey placed his cup carefully in the center of the desk.

“Only if he thought I might drown,” he said, and went out.
---Lord John & Hal in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 2
Book Category: New [Comments]


German oaths were reserved for the most stringent occasions, French being used for minor things like a burnt dinner, and Latin for formal insults committed to paper. Minnie wouldn’t let either Hal or John swear in English in the house, not wanting the boys to acquire low habits. John could have told her it was too late for such caution but didn't.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 2
Book Category: Curses - Insults - Threats [Comments]


“Tell me,” he begged, “that her father did not employ Minnie as a spy.” 

“He did, the scrofulous old bugger,” Hal replied briefly. 

“I caught her in my study one night during a party, magicking the locked drawer of my desk. That’s how I met her.” 

Grey didn’t bother asking what had been in the drawer. He smiled himself and picked up the decanter of sherry from the tea tray, unstoppering it. 

“I gather you did not immediately have her arrested and taken before a magistrate?” 

Hal took a sherry glass and held it out. 

“No. I had her on the hearth rug."
---Lord John & Hal in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 2
Book Category: Sex [Comments]


Hal made his own rules; John had long been aware of that. And if he’d temporarily had the upper hand of Minerva Wattiswade, he’d long since lost it—Hal himself knew that.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 2
Book Category: About Hal [Comments]


With the usual vagaries of spring, the day had not so much dawned as it had merely stopped being night.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 3
Book Category: Imagery [Comments]


It wasn’t that he disliked the man; quite the opposite. But to see this bit of the past rise up before him like a ghost from blood-soaked ground roused feelings he’d gone to great trouble to bury—and memories were stirring that he didn’t want back.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 3
Book Category: Memories [Comments]


Culloden came about fourth on Jamie’s list of things he didn’t want to talk about, preceded only by his wife, Claire; his son, William; and Jack Randall.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 3
Book Category: Culloden [Comments]


“No,” he said definitely. 

“Not for all the tea in China.” Quinn’s long face creased in puzzlement. 

“China? What’s China got to do with it, for all love?” 

Ah. Another of Claire’s sayings, then.
---Jamie & Quinn in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 3
Book Category: In a Different Time [Comments]


He rode down from the fells, prey to an unsettling mix of emotions. Incredulity and impatience at Quinn’s fat-heided scheme, a weary dismay at the realization that the Jacobite Cause was still alive, if only faintly squirming, and irritation at Quinn’s attempt to inveigle him back into it. More than a bit of fear, if he was honest. And notwithstanding all that … joy at seeing Quinn again. It had been a long time since he’d seen the face of a friend.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 3
Book Category: Friends [Comments]


He'd got over Percy. Or at least he thought so, most of the time. Every now and then, though, he'd catch sight of a slender young man with dark curly hair, and his heart would jerk.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 4
Book Category: About Percy [Comments]


“It’s ‘no,’ believe me,” Jamie assured him, straightening up and pulling the bucket of mash closer. “Ye’ve heard your auntie Isobel say it, have ye not?” He hoped Isobel--or someone--said it to Willie on occasion. Not often enough, he was sure of that.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 5
Book Category: Children, Parenthood and Family [Comments]


Putting that aside … it might cause Jamie a bit of bother if she mentioned his meeting Quinn, but if you came right down to it, the one advantage of his present position was that there really wasn’t much anyone could do to make it worse. He was not Dunsany’s prisoner; the baronet couldn’t lock him up, put him in irons, feed him on bread and water, or flog him. The most Dunsany could do was to inform Lord John Grey. 

He snorted at the thought. He doubted that wee pervert could face him, after what had been said during their last meeting, let alone take issue with him over Quinn.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 5
Book Category: Uncategorized [Comments]


He hadn’t any money but enjoyed himself in strolling through the narrow streets, luxuriating in the feeling that—for however short a time—no one in the world knew exactly where he was.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 5
Book Category: freedom [Comments]


He had accustomed himself to thinking of William as a sort of small, glowing light in his mind, something like the flame of a wax candle lit before a saint’s statue in a dark chapel. He couldn’t afford such a candle, and wouldn’t be allowed into the Helwater chapel, but liked to imagine himself lighting one when he said his prayers at night. He would watch the flame catch and swell, wavering a bit and then growing tall and still. He would go to sleep then and feel it burn, a peaceful watch fire in his heart.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 5
Book Category: About William [Comments]


There had been the feeling of someone behind him, he’d been aware of the man’s big legs in their woolen hose and he heard his father laugh and say something above him, but all he’d had eyes for was the horse, that massive, beautiful, gentle creature, so amazing that he’d wanted to embrace it. 

William did embrace it. Entranced, he toddled forward and hugged Philemon’s head in an access of pure love.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 5
Book Category: Animals [Comments]


“Does it taste well?” he asked casually. The question of taste appeared not to have occurred to Willie, who looked startled and frowned at the nail, as though wondering where it had come from.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 5
Book Category: About William [Comments]


William’s eyes narrowed, in a way that reminded Jamie vividly of his own sister about to go berserk.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 5
Book Category: About William [Comments]


“God bless you, ye bloody English bastard,” he said through his teeth. It was his customary prayer when Frank Randall came to his mind- something he tried to avoid happening, but now and then… “Mind them well!”
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 6
Book Category: Children, Parenthood and Family [Comments]


A faint, breathtaking vision of himself walking away from Helwater, his son in his arms, came to him—but vanished at once as the door opened.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 6
Book Category: About William [Comments]


Had it really happened, that memory? Or was it only his desire that now and then brought her so vividly to life, in snatched moments that left him desperate with longing but strangely comforted, as though she had in fact touched him briefly?
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 7
Book Category: Separation [Comments]


But any large city has its own soul, and London was quite different from either Paris or Edinburgh. Paris was secretive, self-satisfied; Edinburgh solidly busy, a merchants’ town. But this … It was rowdy, churning like an anthill, and gave off a sense of pushing, as though the energy of the place would burst its bonds and spill out over the countryside, spill out into the world at large.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 7
Book Category: Cities [Comments]


Had the man been nursing a grudge all this time and finally decided to put paid to Jamie Fraser’s account, once and for all? It was the most likely explanation—and unforgivable things had been said on both sides. Worse, both of them had meant the things they said, and both of them knew it. No excuse of hot blood speaking—though, in all justice, his own blood had boiled, and...
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 7
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


He swallowed hard and tensed his belly muscles. They wouldn’t see him cower. His pride was all he had left—but he had enough of that.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 7
Book Category: Pride [Comments]


His heart beat painfully, eager, for all at once the future had a shape to it. No more long days of mere survival. He had purpose, and the glow of it lit his soul.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 7
Book Category: Vengeance [Comments]


"I've been fucked up the arse by an Englishman before," he said flatly. "Spare me the kiss, aye?"
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 8
Book Category: Curses - Insults - Threats [Comments]


He’d felt the whole of it an illusion. Had waked on the field, convinced he was dead, relieved it was over, the pain, the heartbreak, the struggle. Then had truly waked, to find Jack Randall lying dead on top of him, the captain’s dead weight having cut off circulation to his wounded leg and saved him from bleeding to death—one final ill turn, one last indignity.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 8
Book Category: Culloden [Comments]


He’d fainted before, from pain or shock. But not often, and not in front of an enemy. Now here he sat, drinking tea from a porcelain cup with a gold rim, sharing sandwiches and cakes from a similarly adorned platter, with that very enemy. He was confused, annoyed, and at a considerable disadvantage. He didn’t like it.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 8
Book Category: Uncategorized [Comments]


Paris seemed as distant as the planet Jupiter. The distance between a young spy and a duchess seemed even greater.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 8
Book Category: Uncategorized [Comments]


The Cause had attracted people of romantic temperament; doomed causes usually did.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 8
Book Category: Philosophy [Comments]


John Grey might go to the devil with his blessing, let alone Ireland, but what with the memory of Quinn and his schemes lurking in his mind, the repeated mention of the place was beginning to give Jamie Fraser the creeps.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 8
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


Siverly might be a proper villain, but this wasn’t personal villainy. 

This was the Crown’s way. The way of dealing with resistant natives. Theft, rape, murder … and fire.

Cumberland had done it, “cleansing” the Highlands after Culloden.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 8
Book Category: Culloden [Comments]


Lord Melton had commanded troops at Culloden. Those troops—and the man who sat before him—had very likely remained to take part in the cleansing of the Highlands. 

“No lingering sense of injury,” he’d said. Jamie muttered something very rude under his breath in the Gàidhlig and went on reading, though he found his attention still distracted.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 8
Book Category: Culloden [Comments]


“Nothing is sacred to a man who would rhyme ‘sanguineous’ and ‘cunnilingus,’ I assure you.”
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 9
Book Category: Poetry and Writing [Comments]


Harry, belatedly realizing what he’d given away, looked as innocent as it was possible for a thirty-eight-year old colonel of expansive habit, lecherous appetite, and considerable experience to look.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 9
Book Category: Humor [Comments]


Stephan took it, but rather than shake it, drew him close, and the taste of oranges was suddenly in his mouth.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 9
Book Category: Sex [Comments]


It was true that Stephan had limited experience, no artifice, and not much natural skill. But Grey had forgotten that Stephan was a horseman, and a breeder and trainer of dogs. He didn’t need words to understand what an animal—or a person—was feeling. And he knew what “slowly” meant.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 9
Book Category: Sex [Comments]


He’d been walking for what seemed hours, thinking that the exercise would burn away his anger, make it possible for him to speak to his brother without striking him. It hadn’t. If anything, he grew more infuriated with each step. 

Even for Hal, to whom high-handedness was as natural as breathing, this was raw. Not only to have ignored John’s plainly stated position with regard to Jamie Fraser but to have decided without a word or a by-your-leave to have Fraser brought to London—and to have bloody done it without a word to him, overriding his authority as Fraser’s legal parole officer … and then—then!—to have compounded the crime by informing John—not asking him, oh, no, commanding him!—to go to Ireland in Fraser’s company.… He wanted urgently to wring Hal’s neck.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 9
Book Category: About Hal [Comments]


And the only thing worse than going to Ireland in Jamie Fraser’s company would be doing it with a bad head cold.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 9
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


And it was somewhat reassuring to realize that Fraser would be as uncomfortable as himself. No doubt that discomfort would prevent anything awkward being said.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 9
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


Was this how Harry did it? Just have words show up and start something, all by themselves?
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 9
Book Category: Poetry and Writing [Comments]


He felt as though the two of them were castaways, thrown up together on some island by the storms of life, passing uncharted time by exchanging their stories.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 9
Book Category: Friends [Comments]


“Your wounds—do they still pain you?” 

“No,” he said. He had wounds that still did, but not physical ones.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 9
Book Category: Uncategorized [Comments]


He’d long been struck by the apparent contradiction in the Teutonic character, swinging from cold logic and ferocity in battle to the deepest romanticism and sentimentality. 

Passion, he supposed you’d call it. Weirdly enough, it reminded him of the Scots, who were emotionally much the same, though less disciplined about it.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 9
Book Category: Scots [Comments]


Stephan kissed men frequently, in that exuberant German way of his. But he didn’t kiss them this way.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 9
Book Category: Sex [Comments]


Stephan sighed deeply. “I want to give you pleasure,” he said simply, meeting Grey’s eyes for the first time. “What would you like?” 

Grey was speechless. Not so much at the declaration, moving as it was—but at the multitude of images that one sentence conjured. What would he like?
---Lord John & Stephan in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 9
Book Category: Sex [Comments]


“I’ve no idea,” he said, unwilling to stand about discussing Pardloe and that gentleman’s very individual convictions as to honor.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 10
Book Category: About Hal [Comments]


He could feel the child’s imagined weight on his shoulders, warm and heavy, smelling faintly of wee and strawberry jam. There were some chains you wore because you wanted to.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 10
Book Category: Children, Parenthood and Family [Comments]


Just as well he hadn’t arrived in time for tea. He’d no idea what James Fraser might have done—confronted simultaneously and without warning by the man who’d put him in fetters, and by the one who’d had him flogged, in addition to the man who was currently blackmailing him—but whatever he might have done, Grey wouldn’t have blamed him for doing it.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 10
Book Category: About Jamie [Comments]


Perhaps the play would put the Scot in better temper—though, hearing the shrieks from the crowd as Judy beat Punch into a cocked hat, he began to feel that the influence of the proceedings might not have quite the calmative effect he’d hoped for. He would himself pay considerable money for the privilege of seeing Fraser beat Hal into a cocked hat, though it would cause complications.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 10
Book Category: Humor [Comments]


“I see,” he said, very dry. “So was I to kill him, ye’d be obliged to fight me? And if he killed me, ye’d fight him? And should we kill each other, what then?” 

“I suppose I’d call a surgeon to dispose of your bodies and then commit suicide,” Grey said, a little testily. “But let us not be rhetorical. You have no intent of calling him out, do you?
---Jamie & Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 10
Book Category: Humor [Comments]


His gaze shifted toward Grey in a most uncomfortable way, rather like a large cat making a decision regarding the edibility of some small animal in its vicinity.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 10
Book Category: Imagery [Comments]


“And let the gobshite think I am afraid of him? Damn you, Englishman! Dare ye to suggest such a thing? Were I to call someone out, it would be you, mhic a diabhail—and ye know it."
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 10
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


The man looked apprehensive. Surely to God he must be familiar with an atmosphere of violence, Jamie thought, working in this nest of vipers.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 10
Book Category: Uncategorized [Comments]


“I don’t know,” Grey said slowly. “But perhaps I ought not to take part in such considerations. Siverly did save my life at Quebec, and while that wouldn’t stop me pursuing a case against him … I think—no. I don’t want him dead.” 

Grey didn’t look at Fraser, unsure whether the Scot might consider this reluctance to exterminate Siverly as pusillanimous.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 10
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


"What I meant is that he has …” He hesitated, not quite sure how to put it into words. “… a sense of himself that is quite separate from what society demands. He is inclined to make his own rules.” 

She laughed at that. “No wonder Hal likes him!
---Lord John & Minnie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 11
Book Category: About Jamie [Comments]


It had been a long trip from Newmarket, and God knew what might happen over dinner. An empty bladder and clean hands were as much preparation as it lay within his power to make.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 12
Book Category: Philosophy [Comments]


"While I take the liberty of offense on his behalf, he might be inclined to take action, whereas I would not sully my sword with your blood."
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 12
Book Category: Foreshadowing [Comments]


"He hadn't heard or spoken the Gaidhlig in many years, save in the privacy of his own mind, and hearing words with such a homely, familiar sound made him momentarily feel that he might weep."
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 12
Book Category: Scots [Comments]


“Have French virgins got fleas, do you think?” 

“I never met a Frenchwoman I felt I could ask,” Grey said. “But I have met a good many fleas, and they tend not to be respecters of persons, let alone of purity.
---Lord John & Tom Byrd in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 12
Book Category: Humor [Comments]


The notion that Fraser might be having a lie-in was ludicrous; he doubted the man had ever slept past dawn in his life, and he certainly hadn’t done it any time in the last fifteen years.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 12
Book Category: About Jamie [Comments]


Fraser actually laughed at that, and Grey felt a startled small burst of pleasure at the sound. 

“A flea,” Fraser told Tom. “The whole of the name means ‘the color of the belly of a flea,’ but that’s a bit much, even for the French.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 12
Book Category: Humor [Comments]


He could see why Grey liked the place; if you belonged here, it would embrace you. He himself did not belong here but, for a moment, rather wished he did.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 12
Book Category: Uncategorized [Comments]


The woman’s weight pressed down the mattress beside him, and a hand touched his arm. A light touch, and he felt the hairs bristle in response.

“Forgive me for calling upon you so unceremoniously,” the duchess said, and he could hear the humor in her low voice. “I thought it better to be discreet.” 

“Ye think this is discreet?” he said, barely remembering to lower his own voice. “Holy God!
---Jamie & Minnie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 13
Book Category: Uncategorized [Comments]


One more step, and then heard a final murmur, a whisper so strangled that only the acuteness of his attention brought him the words. 

“Christ, Sassenach. I need ye.” 

He would in that moment have sold his soul to be able to offer comfort. But there was no comfort he could give, and he made his way silently down the stairs, missing the last step in the dark and coming down hard.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 13
Book Category: Separation [Comments]


"Do you know, I believe that is the first time I’ve found myself in a young man’s arms? Quite a pleasant experience; perhaps if I’d had it earlier, I should not have been a nun."
---Sister Eudoxia in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 14
Book Category: Religion [Comments]


“You are without doubt the touchiest son of a bitch I have ever encountered,” Grey said, his face flushed. “And I include in that roster such men as my brother and the King of Prussia. Can you not behave like a civil being for more than ten minutes together?”
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 14
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


By the next afternoon, the inside of Jamie's head was buzzing like a hive of bees, one thought vanishing up the arse of the next before he could get hold of it.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 14
Book Category: Imagery [Comments]


“Well, everyone should have one,” she said firmly, “whether Papist or not. A fridstool is a seat of refuge, of sanctuary. Churches—English churches—often have one, for the use of persons seeking sanctuary, though I must say, they aren’t used as often these days as in former centuries."
---Sister Eudoxia in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 14
Book Category: Solitude [Comments]


He shook his head, half in dismay. Here he sat in an Englishman’s rubbish, talking to a dead Protestant nun with whom he’d had two minutes’ real conversation, asking her to look after a child who had grandparents, an aunt, and servants by the score, all anxious to keep him from the slightest harm.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 14
Book Category: Children, Parenthood and Family [Comments]


He sat a few moments, letting his mind relax, and slowly it dawned upon him that the only truly important thing in this imbroglio was William. The complications and suspicions and possible dangers of the present situation mattered only insofar as they might prevent his returning to Helwater—no further.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 14
Book Category: About William [Comments]


That made sense only if Lord John actually required assistance to apprehend Siverly, and Jamie was not sure that he did. Whatever else you liked to say about the man, he was a competent soldier.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 14
Book Category: About Lord John [Comments]


It was near twilight, but the place glowed like a king’s treasure, reds and pinks and whites and yellows glimmering in an emerald jungle in the dusk, and the air flooded in upon him, moist and caressing, filled with the scents of flowers and leaves, herbs and vegetables. For an instant, he smelled his wife’s hair among them and gulped air as though he’d been shot in the lung.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 14
Book Category: Separation [Comments]


Master me. Or let me your master be. 

He thought he would settle for mutual respect—and, for the first time since Hal had put this scheme in hand, began to look forward to Ireland.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 14
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


“I haven’t seen a cove that sick since me uncle Morris what was a sailor in a merchant man come down with the hocko-grockle,” said Tom, shaking his head. “And he died of it.” 

“I am reliably informed that no one actually dies of seasickness,” Grey said, trying to sound authoritative and reassuring.
---Lord John & Tom Byrd in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 15
Book Category: Seasickness and Boats [Comments]


JAMIE HEARD FOOTSTEPS approaching and hoped fervently that whoever it was intended to shoot him; he’d heard a few such intentions expressed within his hearing recently. He was all for it but lacked the strength to say so.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 15
Book Category: Seasickness and Boats [Comments]


“Rather fortunate that you were not transported after Culloden, then. I doubt you would have survived the voyage.” 

Jamie gave him a narrow look—it was owing to Grey’s personal intervention that he had not been transported, and he hadn’t been at all pleased at the time—but evidently Grey meant nothing now beyond the obvious, and he merely nodded, sipping coffee.
---Jamie & Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 15
Book Category: Seasickness and Boats [Comments]


“There are a good many folk in the world I don’t need, including you, ye wee gomerel. If I thought it right to kill them on that account, I’d have done awa’ wi’ you before we left London.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 16
Book Category: Uncategorized [Comments]


“Ye’ve not had the benefit of meeting His Grace the Duke of Pardloe, but I’d sooner be hunted by the fiend himself.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 16
Book Category: About Hal [Comments]


Well, that was some relief. Fraser might or might not want him dead—certainly he had, at various points of their acquaintance with each other—but he wasn’t willing to have him assassinated. Grey supposed he should be affronted by the implication that it was only Fraser’s fear of dishonor or Hal that was keeping Grey alive, but under the circumstances...
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 16
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


“I suppose it is frivolous to point out that assisting the king’s enemies—even by inaction—is treason,” he remarked eventually. 

“It is not frivolous to point out that I am a convicted traitor,” Fraser replied evenly. “Are there judicial degrees of that crime? Is it additive? Because when they tried me, all they said was ‘treason’ before putting a rope around my neck.
---Jamie & Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 16
Book Category: Deception and treason [Comments]


“They marched me—us—from Inverness to Ardsmuir. With ropes about our necks, to show that our lives were forfeit, given back to us only by the generosity”—he choked, actually choked, on the word, and shook his head, clearing his throat with violence—“the generosity of the king.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 16
Book Category: Deception and treason [Comments]


jimmy choo clearance

jimmy choo outlet store
---Jamie & Ian in , Chapter 16
Book TV Category: About Tom Byrd [Comments]


“Haven’t much faith in my powers of diplomacy, have you?” 

“No, and neither has your brother, or I wouldna be here.
---Jamie & Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 17
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


There was not easiness between them any longer- but there was honesty. And that was a thing he had had- ever would have- with precious few men.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 18
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


His opponent had died, and he regretted that—though not very much, he admitted to himself; Nicholls had been a boor and a waste to society, and, besides, he’d asked for it. Still, his death had been an accident, and Grey really preferred to kill on purpose, when it was necessary.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 18
Book Category: War, Fighting and Violence [Comments]


Quite suddenly—and with a yearning that astonished him with its strength—he thought of those rare evenings of friendship, for they had been friends, in spite of their uneasy relationship as prisoner and gaoler; had shared conversation, humor, experience, a commonality of mind that was rare indeed. If he had only had more control, had not made his feelings known … Well, a good many regrettable things wouldn’t have happened, and he had cursed himself on many occasions since, for his bad judgment.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 18
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


There was not easiness between them any longer—but there was honesty. And that was a thing he had had—ever would have—with precious few men.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 18
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


You could tell from the books whether a library was meant for show or not. Books that were used had an open, interested feel to them, even if closed and neatly lined up on a shelf in strict order with their fellows. You felt as though the book took as much interest in you as you did in it and was willing to help when you reached for it.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 19
Book Category: Poetry and Writing [Comments]


Besides, he was in no hurry to return to his companions. With luck, one of them would have killed the other before he came back, thus simplifying his life. At the moment, he didn't much mind which one survived.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 19
Book Category: Uncategorized [Comments]


The abbot turned the bowl, holding it sideways so that the lantern light illumined the dish. The cold grue slid right down the backs of Jamie’s legs, and he shuddered. The carving showed what was plainly a standing stone—cleft down the center.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 19
Book Category: Magic - Witches - Supernatural [Comments]


I was going to recommend that you find a good girl and marry her, but I saw how it is with you; your wife’s still with you.” He spoke in an entirely matter-of-fact tone of voice. 

“It wouldn’t be fair on a young woman, were you to marry while that’s the case.
---Father Michael in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 19
Book Category: Separation [Comments]


“You must pray for the strength to do the right thing—God will give it to you.” He nodded mutely. He’d prayed for strength like that twice before, and it had been granted. He hadn’t thought he’d survive, either time, but he had. He hoped if it came to a third time, he wouldn't.
---Jamie & Father Michael in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 19
Book Category: Strength [Comments]


I’d not thought from Alexander’s letters that ye lacked courage, but perhaps he was wrong in what he thought of you.” 

“Oh, no, Father,” he said, and his voice dropped low in his throat. “Dinna be trying that one on me. Aye, I ken what it is to lead men, and how it’s done. I’ll not be led.
---Jamie & Father Michael in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 19
Book Category: Courage [Comments]


“No,” Jamie said between his teeth. “I have left home and family before, for the sake of duty. I lost my wife to it. And I saw what that duty led to. Mind me, Father—if it comes to war, it will not be different this time. It. Will. Not. Be. Different!
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 19
Book Category: War, Fighting and Violence [Comments]


Must he tell the priest exactly why he was certain that this effort to restore the Stuarts would not succeed, any more than the Rising in Scotland had? 

No, he decided. He wouldn’t. Claire was his, alone. There was nothing sinful in his love for her, nothing that concerned Father Michael, and he meant to keep her to himself.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 19
Book Category: Uncategorized [Comments]


“A man may smile, and smile, and be a villain,” he thought to himself. 

He had himself met personable villains. And amiable fools whose actions did more damage than deliberately wicked men. His mouth set at the memory of Charles Edward Stuart. He had no doubt that this Siverly was a villain—but what kind of villain?
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 20
Book Category: Villains [Comments]


If he himself had ventured to touch the man...

But I have.  If not directly. The open neck of the shirt had slipped back, and the faint glimmer of the scars showed once more.

Jamie's head turned, and his eyes opened, as though he had felt the pressure of Grey's gaze. He didn't speak but lay quiet, meeting John's eyes. Grey was conscious all at once of the silence; the pub's customers had all gone home, the landlord and his family retired for the night.

"I'm sorry," he said, very softly.

"Ego te absolvo," Fraser murmured, and shut his eyes.
---Jamie & Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 21
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


Running down the list of increasingly dire possibilities, Grey thought of highwaymen, who were attracted by the horse (surely not; the thing looked like a cow, and an elderly cow at that) and had then noticed the gaudy vest and shot Fraser when he was unable to produce any money. (He should have insisted Jamie have money; it wasn’t right to keep him penniless.) A larger than usual mudhole that had forced him off the road, there to fall into a quaking bog, which had promptly swallowed him and the horse. A sudden apoplexy—Fraser had once mentioned that his father had died of an apoplexy. Were such things hereditary? 

“Or perhaps a goose fell dead out of the sky and hit him on the head,” he muttered, kicking viciously at a stone on the path.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 21
Book Category: Worry [Comments]


In the event, Tom returned with the landlord’s wife, bearing a moist cloth full of sliced, charred onions, which she applied, with many expressions of sympathetic horror (punctuated by loud expressions of astonishment as to how such a kind, sweet horse as our Bedelia, and her so gentle a soul as could have given our Lord a ride into Jerusalem, might ever have come to give the gentleman such a cruel toss, which made Fraser grind his teeth audibly), to the sufferer’s shoulder, leaving the more delicate application to Tom.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 21
Book Category: Humor [Comments]


Grey was conscious of a sudden lurch within, watching sparks of copper glint from the thick dark-red strands that slid through the woman’s fingers. A sharp spurt of what began as simple jealousy ended as a sense of baffled longing as he saw Fraser, eyes closed, relax and turn his cheek into the pillow, his body yielding, unthinking, compliant to the woman’s touch.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 21
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


“I shall never fight in that cause again,” he said at last, softly, and Grey thought he spoke with a sense of true regret. “Not from cowardice, but from the sure knowledge of its futility. Major Siverly’s nay friend to me. And should there be men I know involved in this … I will do them nay service to let it go further.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 21
Book Category: Jacobites and Jacobite cause [Comments]


He’d done what planning was possible. Once the strategy and tactics of a battle were decided, you put it out of your mind until you came to the field and saw what was what. Trying to fight a battle in your head was pointless and did nothing but fret the nerves and exhaust the energies.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 22
Book Category: Planning [Comments]


“His lordship gave me his dagger to keep for him.”

“That will be a great help,” Jamie assured him gravely. “Dinna stick anyone with it unless I tell ye, though, aye? I dinna want to have to save ye both from the hangman.
---Jamie & Tom Byrd in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 24
Book Category: Uncategorized [Comments]


“Out of Athlone Castle? Man, are ye demented?” 

“Aye, I am,” Jamie said crossly. “But I mean to do it, anyway.” 

“Why? The man’s not only English, not only your captor—he’s a fecking murderer!” 

“No, that he’s not,” Jamie said, with decision. “He may be a good many disagreeable things, but not that.
---Jamie & Quinn in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 25
Book Category: About Lord John [Comments]


“We’ll get him back,” he said, and was surprised at how gratified he was to see relief and trust flood Tom’s round face.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 25
Book Category: Trust and Respect [Comments]


“Now, then. Ye know as well as I do, ye can’t make wine without squeezin’—” 

“Don’t bloody say it!” Jamie had the obscure feeling that cliché on top of treasonous insanity was more than anyone should be obliged to put up with.
---Jamie & Quinn in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 25
Book Category: Deception and treason [Comments]


Some delay, he thought, remembering all too well what it took to assemble even an ill-equipped rabble, let alone feed and transport them. And that was reckoning without the Bonnie Prince himself—a weak reed for a revolution to lean upon, and surely to God Quinn must know that much.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 25
Book Category: Jacobites and Jacobite cause [Comments]


“Thank you, Mr. Fraser,” Grey murmured, shrugging into his coat as he headed for the door in his turn. In truth, he hadn’t expected rescue, had only half-hoped for it, and his chest filled with a breathless excitement.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 25
Book Category: Uncategorized [Comments]


“I shouldn’t have addressed you by name,” Grey said, low-voiced. “I’m sorry.” 

Fraser shrugged, eyes squinted against the gloom that cloaked the courtyard. It was not quite drizzling, but the slates gleamed dully with wet where the lantern light reached them. 

“Nay bother. There’re none sae many redheided Scotsmen o’ my size abroad in County Roscommon. It wouldna take them long to learn my name—and they wouldna require one to shoot me, in any case.
---Jamie & Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 25
Book Category: Uncategorized [Comments]


“I said I wouldna do it, and that’s flat!” Fraser’s voice was low, intense. 

“Ye’ll turn your back on the men ye fought with, all the blood spilt for the Cause?” 

“Aye, I will. And so would you, if ye’d half the sense of a day-old chick.
---Jamie & Quinn in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 26
Book Category: Jacobites and Jacobite cause [Comments]


“You mean you think I was a fool to ask you to get me out of Athlone.” 

“If I thought that, I wouldna have done it,” Jamie said bluntly. “But I like to know why I’m riskin’ my life when I do it.
---Jamie & Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 27
Book Category: Uncategorized [Comments]


The words of the oath they’d made him speak when they spared his life had burned his lips when he spoke them; they burned his heart now. He likely knew none of the Wild Hunt personally—but that didn’t make betrayal of those men any the lighter a burden.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 27
Book Category: Oaths [Comments]


So he’d gone, then—to use the cup. John Grey would have to find another ferryman. Ironic, considering where he’d just decided his duty lay—but he had promised Quinn to speak to the abbot and would just have to leave the matter now to God and hope the Almighty shared his view of the situation.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 27
Book Category: Jacobites and Jacobite cause [Comments]


There were frogs in the ditches, in the bogs that lay beyond the scrim of trees. They called, high and low, shrill and bass, cascading over one another in a vast, pulsating chorus. At a distance, sitting on a lawn with that chorus as background, watching the stars come out, the sound might be no more than a pastoral, the song of spring.

This close, it was still the song of spring, but that song was revealed to be what the pagans had always known it to be—the blind urge to seize, to mate, to spill blood and seed heedlessly into the earth, wallow in crushed flowers, writhe in the juices of grass and mud. Those bloody frogs were shrieking their passion, raw-throated and triumphant. Hundreds of them. The racket was deafening.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 28
Book Category: Sex [Comments]


“What kind of flapdoodle is that?”

Grey thought briefly of inquiring whether there was more than one sort of flapdoodle and, if so, what the categories might be, but thought better of it and ignored the question as rhetorical.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 28
Book Category: Humor [Comments]


John felt the night as something wild creeping upon him, the force of spring itself rising from the ground into his feet, his legs, bursting through his body ’til the blood throbbed in his fingers, pulsed in his chest.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 28
Book Category: Imagery [Comments]


He could smell Jamie, smell the musk of his body, the dried sweat and dust in his clothes, and felt suddenly wolflike and feral, longing changed to outright hunger. He wanted.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 28
Book Category: Sex [Comments]


“It … wasna a scream of fear, or even anger. It … ehm … well, it was the way a woman will scream, sometimes, if she’s … pleased.” 

“In bed, you mean.” It wasn’t a question. “So do men. Sometimes.” 

You idiot! Of all the things you might have said … 

He would have berated himself further for having brought back the echo of his unfortunate remark in the stable at Helwater, that injudicious—that criminally stupid remark
---Jamie & Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 28
Book Category: Sex [Comments]


"sometimes the stolen ones come back. But they come back two hundred years later. And all—all they knew and loved—are dead.” 

“How terrible,” John said quietly. He could hear Fraser’s breathing, heavy, like a man struggling against tears, and wondered why this aspect of the tale should move him so.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 28
Book Category: Magic - Witches - Supernatural [Comments]


“You could … have helped,” he said to Fraser.

“Ye managed brawly on your own,” Fraser assured him gravely, and to his mortification, Grey found that this word of praise gratified him exceedingly.
---Jamie & Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 28
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


"La Dame Blanche, they called her in Paris, and for good reason. She saw the end of the Cause- and its death. Believe me Thomas. This venture, too, is doomed, and I ken that fine. I wouldna have it take ye down wi' it. For the sake of our shared past, I beg ye- stand clear."
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 29
Book Category: History [Comments]


“I’ve got a blister on my heel the size of a pigeon’s egg, and it looks better than you do. What the devil’s happened?
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 29
Book Category: Uncategorized [Comments]


“Minnie, my dear,” he said affectionately. “You are a pearl of great price.” 

“Well, yes,” she said modestly. “I am.
---Hal & Minnie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 29
Book Category: Uncategorized [Comments]


Lally was also a prisoner, true, but one still with followers, informants, one who listened and planned. A man who would leave the stage of war only when carried off it feetfirst. A man who hasn’t given up, he thought, with a tinge of bitterness.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 29
Book Category: Jacobites and Jacobite cause [Comments]


“Where is Mr. Fraser?” he asked, putting a hand on the doorjamb and looking carefully from corner to corner of the room, lest he might have overlooked a large Scotsman somewhere among the furnishings.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 30
Book Category: Humor [Comments]


He can’t have done it for me. The thought carried some regret; he wished it were true. But he was realist enough to know that Fraser wouldn’t have gone to such lengths merely to distract attention from Twelvetrees’s accusation of sodomy, no matter what he personally thought of Grey at the moment—and Grey didn’t even know that.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 30
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


Justice. There were a good many different ways to achieve that enigmatic state of affairs, in descending levels of social acceptability. Statute. Court-martial. Duello. Murder.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 30
Book Category: War, Fighting and Violence [Comments]


“Honor,” Fraser said, and his voice shook with fury. “You dare speak to me of honor?” 

“I—” 

A large fist crashed down on the table, and all the ornaments rattled. The bud vase fell over.

“Be still! Ye seize a man who is your captive—and your captive by honor alone, sir, for believe me, if I had none, I should have been in France these four years past! Seize and compel him by threat to do your bidding, and by that bidding to betray ancient comrades, to forswear vows, betray friendship and loyalty, to become your very creature … and ye think ye do me honor to count me an Englishman!?
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 31
Book Category: Honor - Courage - Duty - Justice [Comments]


Fraser rounded on him, dangerous—and beautiful—as a red stag at bay, and Grey felt his heart seize in his chest.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 31
Book Category: About Jamie [Comments]


“If I thought that there was the slightest chance of success,” he said, “I should ha’ kept my own counsel. But there is not, and I know it. I canna let it happen again.” 

Grey heard the desolation in his voice and glanced briefly at Hal. Did his brother know the enormity of what Fraser had just done?
---Jamie & Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 31
Book Category: Jacobites and Jacobite cause [Comments]


“If I let him fight Twelvetrees and Twelvetrees kills him … that would cause trouble for you, he being nominally under your protection as the officer in charge of his parole.” 

Grey felt a sudden clench in the belly. “I should not consider damage to my reputation the worst result arising from that situation,” he said, imagining—all too well—Jamie Fraser dying in some bleak dawn, his pumping blood hot on Grey’s guilty hands. He took a gulp of wine, not tasting it. 

“Well, neither would I,” Hal admitted, putting down the tattered stem. “I’d rather he wasn’t killed. I like the man, stubborn and contentious as he is."
---Lord John & Hal in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 31
Book Category: About Jamie [Comments]


“It’s simple, Hal. Put yourself in his place, and think what you’d do. He may not be an Englishman, but his honor is equal to yours, and so is his determination. I could not pay him a greater compliment.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 31
Book Category: Honor - Courage - Duty - Justice [Comments]


He thought of that just now and wondered briefly just what Jamie Fraser would do, if made the recipient of some particularly florid sentiment of a personal nature, with Grey safely out of neck-breaking range.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 32
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


"It is the blessing for a warrior going out. The blessing of Michael of the Red Domain." His eyes met Grey's squarely, a darker blue than the dawning sky. "May the grace of Michael Archangel strengthen your arm ... John."
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 32
Book Category: War, Fighting and Violence [Comments]


The lines of the old folk song drifted through his mind: God send each noble man at his end / Such hawks, such hounds, and such a friend. He wondered briefly which was which and decided that Tom must be his faithful hound, Harry of course the friend, and Jamie Fraser his hawk, untamed and ferocious but there with him at the last—if that’s what it was, though in all honesty he thought not. 

I can feel my heart beating. Feel my breath. How can it stop?
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 32
Book Category: Friends [Comments]


“I spoke with Colonel Quarry. We agreed that I should have the honor of seconding you.” Grey wondered for an instant whether “agreed” was a euphemism for “knocked on the head,” as he couldn’t see Quarry yielding his office with any grace.
---Lord John & Harry Quarry in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 32
Book Category: War, Fighting and Violence [Comments]


"There are a great many women, though—particularly young and giddy ones—who positively swoon over men who fight duels. The ones who survive, that is,” she added pragmatically.
---Minnie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 33
Book Category: Uncategorized [Comments]


"...Ye weren't dead when I picked ye up."

"You picked me up?"

"You asked me to, did you not?" Fraser gave him a look of mild exasperation. "Ye were bleeding like a stuck hog, but it wasna spurting out, and I could feel ye breathing and your heart beating all right while I carried ye back to the coach."

"Oh. Thank You." Dammit, couldn't he have waited a few moments longer to pass out?
---Jamie & Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 34
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


“I said I thought this a jesuitical piece o’ reasoning, but he replied that as I’m a Papist, he supposed I could have no reasonable objection on those grounds."
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 34
Book Category: Humor [Comments]


“Would you warn him—if you could?” Grey asked. He oughtn’t, but was possessed by curiosity. 

“I would,” Fraser replied without hesitation. He turned round now and looked down at Grey, expressionless. “He was once my friend.” 

So was I, Grey thought, and took more brandy. Am I now again? But not even the most exigent curiosity would make him ask.
---Jamie & Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 34
Book Category: Friends [Comments]


He’d once seen Minnie’s cook take a sharpened spoon and cut the flesh of a melon out in little balls. He felt as though each of Bowles’s words had been a jab of that spoon, slicing out neat chunks of his heart and bowels, one at a time, scraping him to the rind.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 35
Book Category: Guilt [Comments]


God knew what they'd write. He only hoped none of it would be about him; he’d experienced the attentions of the press before, though in an entirely favorable way. Having seen the favors of the printers at close range, he could only hope that God would have mercy on those they didn’t like.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 35
Book Category: Journalism [Comments]


He could hear the watch ticking in his pocket, each tiny sound seeming to last forever, the stream of them endless. How impossibly long it would be before he died, for only that could put an end to the echo of Bowles’s words in the hollow of his mind.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 35
Book Category: Fear - Grief - Anguish - Horror [Comments]


He wished passionately that he was one of those women, had a right still to engage in the ordinariness of life.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 35
Book Category: Fear - Grief - Anguish - Horror [Comments]


“Kyrie, eleison,” Fraser said at last, very quietly. Lord, have mercy. 

“Well enough for you,” Grey said without rancor. “It must help, to think there is some ultimate sense to things."
---Jamie & Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 35
Book Category: Religion [Comments]


“Her Grace says that ye did it for the sake of your friendship with me,” Fraser said at last, quietly. “And I am inclined to think her right.” 

“Her Grace should mind her own bloody business.” Grey turned away abruptly and began walking. Fraser caught him up within a pace or two, bootheels muffled on the sandy path. Small forms darted in and out of the scattered light from the lanterns of the big houses: children, mostly, scavenging the piles of horse droppings left on the riding path. 

Grey had noticed the nice distinction: “for the sake of your friendship with me,” as opposed to the simpler—but far more threatening—“for me.” He didn’t know if the distinction was Minnie’s or Fraser’s, but supposed it didn’t matter. Both statements were true, and if Fraser preferred the greater distance of the former, he was welcome to it.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 35
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


“Ye killed him as an enemy, did ye not? The fact that he wasna one in fact is not your fault.” 

“That is a very specious argument.” 

“Doesna mean it’s not true.
---Jamie & Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 35
Book Category: War, Fighting and Violence [Comments]


“I think I am trying to lead ye to the point at issue—which is that no matter how much a man may try to do what is right, the outcome may not be one that he either foresees or desires. And that’s grounds for regret—sometimes verra great regret,” he added more softly, “but not for everlasting guilt. For it is there we must throw ourselves on God’s mercy and hope to receive it."
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 35
Book Category: Choices [Comments]


He knew the lady’s maid slightly, from his visits to Helwater, and while she was a fine-looking young woman, she was distinctly … well, common. Fraser’s first wife had been distinctly uncommon.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 35
Book Category: About Claire [Comments]


He realized with a lesser shock that he felt very hungry—and, with a mingled sense of shame and resignation, that he was pleased to be alive.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 35
Book Category: Guilt [Comments]


There were, after all, many situations that simply had to be handed over to God, as no human agency was capable of dealing with them.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 36
Book Category: Religion [Comments]


He didn’t think of Willie much, but the ache of his absence was always there, along with the other scars on his heart left when someone was torn away. He envied the Greys their possession of each other.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 36
Book Category: Children, Parenthood and Family [Comments]


If life stole dear ones from you, sometimes it gave you others. Ian Murray had become his blood brother after Willie died; sometime he would see Ian again, and meanwhile the knowledge of his presence in the world—looking after things at Lallybroch—was a true comfort.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 36
Book Category: Friends [Comments]


And neatly, as neatly as a man could print with a finger dipped in his own blood, he had written the word “TEIND” on the wall above his shabby cot. A tithe to hell.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 36
Book Category: Death [Comments]


Others had seen the body, but he knew he was the sole true witness to Quinn’s death. God knew he understood this death as few others could. Knew what it was to have lost the meaning of your life. Had God not bound him to the earth with the ties of flesh and blood, he might well have come to such an end himself. Might come to it now, were it not for those same ties.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 37
Book Category: Death [Comments]


He turned his ear to the ground and felt the beating of Helwater, a quicker sound, one that would support him in his weakness, comfort him in loneliness. He could hear the speaking of its waters and the growing of the grass, the movement of horses and the silence of its rocks.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 38
Book Category: Imagery [Comments]


A scatter of stones, picked up because of their feel in the hand or a pretty color. He counted them; there were eleven: one each for his sister, for Ian, for Young Jamie, Maggie, Kitty, Janet, Michael, and Young Ian; one for his daughter, Faith, who had died at birth; another for the child Claire had carried when she went; the last—a piece of rough amethyst—for Claire herself. He must look out for another now: the right stone for William. He wondered briefly why he had not done that before. Because he hadn’t felt the right to claim William even in the privacy of his own heart, he supposed.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 38
Book Category: Children, Parenthood and Family [Comments]


“God be with ye, Englishman,” he said. Whatever John Grey had thought of Jamie’s announcement that he meant to court Betty Mitchell—Jamie grinned to himself at memory of Lord John’s face, comically trying to suppress his astonishment in the name of courtesy—he’d brought Jamie back to Helwater.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 38
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


The odd half-friendship they had forged from necessity could not in justice be forgotten—but neither could the resumption of their present positions as, essentially, master and slave. Was there any ground that would let them meet again as equals?
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 38
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


Roberts, who was not, after all, a stupid man, went rapidly to her, taking her by the arm and bending solicitously down to her. 

“Are you all right, my dear?” 

“I—yes. It’s only … oh, poor Toby!” 

Betty was not stupid, either, and burst into tears, burying her face in Roberts’s shoulder. 

Jamie, being the third wise party present, silently praised God and backed hastily away, murmuring inconsequent regrets.
---Jamie & Betty & Roberts in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 38
Book Category: Men and Women [Comments]


To this point, he could not really have said that he loved William. Feel the terror of responsibility for him, yes. Carry thought of him like a gem in his pocket, certainly, reaching now and then to touch it, marveling. But now he felt the perfection of the tiny bones of William's spine through his clothes, smooth as marbles under his fingers, smelled the scent of him, rich with the incense of innocence and the faint tang of shit and clean linen. And thought his heart would break with love.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 39
Book Category: Children, Parenthood and Family [Comments]


He’d married Claire without a single thought of his place or hers. For all he’d known then, she was a—well, no. He smiled a little, involuntarily. He’d been an exile and an outlaw, with a price on his head. And he’d never have taken her for a slattern or peasant. 

“I would have taken ye even if that was so, lass,” he said softly. “I’d have had ye, no matter if I’d known the truth from the start.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 39
Book Category: About Claire [Comments]


He felt amazingly self-conscious, like a boy unable to say anything to an attractive girl. He’d be blushing, next thing, he thought, disgusted with himself.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 40
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


"What did you do to the lawyer?" he asked Jamie in German. "You didn't kill him, did you?" It was pouring outside; he hoped he wouldn't have to go and hide Wilberforce's body.
---Lord John in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 41
Book Category: Jamie and John [Comments]


Jamie squatted by Betty but was relieved to see her already struggling to rise, using the most unladylike language he’d heard since Claire had left him.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 41
Book Category: Humor [Comments]


He pressed his lips tight. He supposed he owed it to Geneva Dunsany and her parents to save her little sister.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 41
Book Category: Guilt [Comments]


“There is a thing I want,” Fraser said, very low-voiced, still in German. “But it cannot be blackmail or look like it in any way. If there were some means to suggest it very tactfully …” 

“I see your opinion of my diplomacy has improved. What is it that you want?” 

A brief smile touched Fraser’s face, though it vanished almost at once. 

“The wee lad,” he said. “They make him wear a corset. I would like to see him free of it.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 41
Book Category: About William [Comments]


He touched the rough crucifix that lay against his chest and whispered to the moving air, "Lord, that she might be safe, she and my children."

Then turned his cheek to her reaching hand and touched her through the veils of time.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 43
Book Category: Love [Comments]


They’d brought down the Yule log to the house that afternoon, all the household taking part, the women bundled to the eyebrows, the men ruddy, flushed with the labor, staggering, singing, dragging the monstrous log with ropes, its rough skin packed with snow, a great furrow left where it passed, the snow plowed high on either side.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 43
Book Category: Christmas [Comments]


Willie. God, Willie. I’m so glad they gave him your name. He seldom thought of his brother, but every now and then, he could feel Willie with him; sometimes his mother or his father. More often, Claire. 

I wish ye could see him, Sassenach, he thought. He’s a bonnie lad. Loud and obnoxious, he added with honesty, but bonnie.
---Jamie in The Scottish Prisoner, Chapter 43
Book Category: About William [Comments]